Here are some of December’s top new books for educators:

Computational Thinking and Coding for Every Student book cover

Computational Thinking and Coding for Every Student: The Teacher’s Getting-Started Guide
Jane Krauss, Kiki Prottsman

Our students are avid users and consumers of technology. Isn’t it time that they see themselves as the next technological innovators, too? Computational Thinking and Coding for Every Student is the beginner’s guide for K-12 educators who want to learn to integrate the basics of computer science into their curriculum. Readers will find

  • Practical strategies for teaching computational thinking and the beginning steps to introduce coding at any grade level, across disciplines, and during out-of-school time
  • Instruction-ready lessons and activities for every grade
  • Specific guidance for designing a learning pathway for elementary, middle, or high school students
  • Justification for making coding and computer science accessible to all
  • A glossary with definitions of key computer science terms, a discussion guide with tips for making the most of the book, and companion website with videos, activities, and other resources

Momentum for computer science education is growing as educators and parents realize how fundamental computing has become for the jobs of the future. This book is for educators who see all of their students as creative thinkers and active contributors to tomorrow’s innovations.

Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates book cover

Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates Second Edition
Neil Selwyn

Will technology replace the school and university? Will technology replace the teacher? What do we really know about technology and learning? Does technology make education more individualized? What does the future hold for technology and education? What can be learnt from the history of technology use in education?

The book focuses attention on the connections between recent technology developments and broader changes in education practice, education policy and education theory over the past 10 years. It also challenges us to reflect on future directions and controversies for education in the (post)digital age. Expanded study questions, annotated further reading and a new glossary of key terms are included to support readers. An updated companion website links to case study examples, two bonus chapters and much more for students and lecturers.

Hard Questions on Global Educational Change book cover

Hard Questions on Global Educational Change: Policies, Practices, and the Future of Education
Pasi Sahlberg, Jonathan Hasak, Vanessa Rodriguez

This new book, from internationally renowned education scholar Pasi Sahlberg and his colleagues, focuses on some of the most controversial issues in contemporary education reform around the world.

The authors devote a chapter to each of these “hard questions”:

  • Does parental choice improve education systems?
  • Is there a future for teacher unions?
  • What is the right answer to the standardized testing question?
  • Can schools prepare children for the 21st-century workplace?
  • Will technology save schools?
  • Can anyone be a teacher?
  • Should higher education be for the public good?
  • What knowledge and skills should an educator have?

Each educational change question sheds much-needed light on today’s large-scale education policies and related reforms around the world. The authors focus on what makes each question globally significant, what we know from international research, and what can be inferred from benchmark evidence. The final chapter offers a model for policymakers with implications for teaching, learning, and schooling overall.

Serving Students Who Are Homeless book cover

Serving Students Who Are Homeless: A Resource Guide for Schools, Districts, and Educational Leaders
Ronald E. Hallett, Linda Skrla

Schools and districts are seeing unprecedented numbers of students and families living without residential stability. Although the McKinney-Vento Act has been around for over two decades, many district- and site-level practitioners have a difficult time interpreting and implementing the Act’s mandates within their local contexts. This book provides much-needed guidance to help educational leaders support students who are homeless and highly mobile students who face significant barriers related to access and academic success.

The authors employ several different strategies to help translate complex state and federal policies into effective practices. They include policy analysis, examples of successful approaches, tools for training staff, youth experiences, and address the role of school districts in serving marginalized students. Serving Students Who Are Homeless can be used as a professional development tool at the local and district level, and as a textbook in higher education settings that prepare entry-level and advanced-credential administrators, counselors, school psychologists, and curriculum leaders.

Teaching Controversial Issues book cover

Teaching Controversial Issues: The Case for Critical Thinking and Moral Commitment in the Classroom
Nel Noddings, Laurie Brooks

In this book, eminent educational philosopher Nel Noddings and daughter Laurie Brooks explain how teachers can foster critical thinking through the exploration of controversial issues. The emphasis is on the use of critical thinking to understand and collaborate, not simply to win arguments. The authors describe how critical thinking that encourages dialogue across the school disciplines and across social/economic classes prepares students for participation in democracy. They offer specific, concrete strategies for addressing a variety of issues related to authority, religion, gender, race, media, sports, entertainment, class and poverty, capitalism and socialism, and equality and justice. The goal is to develop individuals who can examine their own beliefs, those of their own and other groups, and those of their nation, and can do so with respect and understanding for others’ values.

"They're All Writers": Teaching Peer Tutoring in the Elementary Writing Center book cover

“They’re All Writers:” Teaching Peer Tutoring in the Elementary Writing Center
Jennifer Sanders, Rebecca L. Damron

“They’re All Writers” will help teachers explore the power of writing centers. In elementary school classrooms across the country, writing instruction (not grammar worksheets or spelling drills) is still the neglected “R.” In this book, classroom teachers will find foundational information about the writing process with everything they need to begin and facilitate a peer tutoring writing center. Student-led writing centers harness the social and instructional power of students working and learning together, and this book includes specific lessons to teach students how to be effective peer tutors and how to be better writers.

Did you miss last month’s recommendations? It’s not too late to see November’s top new books for educators.

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Ashleigh Lutz

Born and raised in the Phoenix area, Ashleigh graduated from Arizona State University with a BA in Psychology and a minor in Women and Gender Studies. She first discovered her appetite for writing in elementary school and has found numerous avenues since to channel this passion, including over three years in higher education creating a variety of tutorials, resources, and templates, and working directly with students. Ashleigh is eager to support Edgenuity’s commitment to helping both teachers and students meet important goals and explore their own passions. In addition to writing, a few of Ashleigh’s favorite things include trivia, the outdoors (away from the Phoenix heat), gardening, and cats.